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Hi, I'm Judith. I am a two-times best-selling author. I have an

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The point of view in any story is important because it provides a guide to manage the execution of your story. Most works of fiction use one point of view although a second perspective can be brought into the story for a short period of time.


Third Person Perspective is the most common method of conveying a ...

Surreal writer

When an author decides to write fiction one the primary methods of storytelling is through a first person perspective. For many writers this is the most comfortable manner of storytelling.


In a first person narrative the reader is allowed to relate to the story one dimensionally...

Have you given much thought to the voice of your narrator? Perhaps you assumed the narrator in your novel should remain neutral. Many writers believe that the narrator should have little in the way of identity and the use of a narrator is essentially a necessary means of moving the story from one scene to the next...


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Who is Telling the Story?

The point of view in any story is important because it provides a guide to manage the execution of your story. Most works of fiction use one point of view although a second perspective can be brought into the story for a short period of time.


Third Person Perspective is the most common method of conveying a work of fiction. This method allows the narrator to have at least limited omniscience. The narrator has limited access to the knowledge and feelings of the characters in the story and can take the reader from one character setting to another easily. There is no questioning of how the narrator knows so much about each individual; it is a premise that is simply accepted by most readers.


Unlike first person perspective that conveys the story from the perspective of a cast member, third person perspective narration does not allow the narrator to actually participate in the action. They are simply the mechanism that operates outside the story to bring the various story threads together.


If a writer were to give the narrator full access to all feelings and thoughts of the cast of characters the story would be a little flat because nothing would be left to the imagination.


Third person narratives can be spotted by the predominate us of words such as they, he, she and it. The narrator talks about others - never about himself.


The least common perspective is Second Person Perspective. Very few novels can utilize this approach throughout an entire work.


This type of fiction relies on words like you and you're. The use of this type of perspective either assumes you will connect with the story as if it is written to you or that you will understand you are reading a private story written to and about someone else. It is rare to find a full manuscript that uses this perspective although an Epistolary Novel such the C.S. Lewis masterpiece ìScrewtape Lettersî may likely be considered second person perspective in its entirety.


The trouble many writers get into is an unintentional shift in perspective. This can be used effectively under certain circumstances, however the shift in perspective needs a breaking point to allow the reader to gain some understanding that a shift has taken place. Without a break to qualify the shift in point of view the story becomes confusing because the reader has to work hard at discovering who is actually telling the story.




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it. The narrator talks about others - never about himself.


The least common perspective is Second Person Perspective. Very few novels can utilize this approach throughout an entire work.


This type of fiction relies on words like you and you're. The use of this type of perspective either assumes you will connect with the story as if it is written to you or that you will understand you are reading a private story written to and about someone else. It is rare to find a full manuscript that uses this perspective although an Epistolary Novel such the C.S. Lewis masterpiece ìScrewtape Lettersî may likely be considered second person perspective in its entirety.


The trouble many writers get into is an unintentional shift in perspective. This can be used effectively under certain circumstances, however the shift in perspective needs a breaking point to allow the reader to gain some understanding that a shift has taken place. Without a break to qualify the shift in point of view the story becomes confusing because the reader has to work hard at discovering who is actually telling the story.




Who Is Speaking? Choosing A Narrator's Voice

Have you given much thought to the voice of your narrator? Perhaps you assumed the narrator in your novel should remain neutral. Many writers believe that the narrator should have little in the way of identity and the use of a narrator is essentially a necessary means of moving the story from one scene to the next.


It may come as a surprise to learn that your narrator can, and SHOULD, have a distinctive voice. The narrator should be used to do more than simply take the reader on a guided tour of your story.


The technique used to add life to your narrator is called 'Voice'. How you ultimately choose to define the character of your narrator can add a new dimension to your work. By adding a unique personality to your narrator the reader has a chance to visualize the story through the eyes of someone that intrigues them. They may not particularly like the narrator, but the voice you choose help the reader find a new facet of interest in your story.


Your narrator could have a strained relationship with the main character and might make occasionally negative comments as they unfold the story. The reason for the animosity could be explained and resolved as the story unfolds.


The Disney movie "Emperor's New Groove" was narrated by the main character who interjected humor, sarcasm and arrogance that allowed the viewer to gain a clearer picture of the primary character, the conflict his actions created, and the ultimate need for him to lose some of his pride. What is interesting is the narratorís voice also allowed the viewer to actually enjoy the Emperorís character even more.


In western fiction the narrator often provides range-hardened wisdom during the course of the narrative that leaves you feeling as if you've saddled up a horse and are paired up an agreeable partner that has much to teach you.


Some writing intentionally portrays the narrator as distant and rather formal in their story telling. In this case the writer does not wish to have the narrator play a significant role in the storyline and only wishes them to fill in the blanks with no commentary or personality showing through.


Determining the voice of your narrator can be an important element in the development of your story. Choosing the 'voice' of your narrator may be best achieved early in the story-writing process to avoid needless rewriting.





character, the conflict his actions created, and the ultimate need for him to lose some of his pride. What is interesting is the narratorís voice also allowed the viewer to actually enjoy the Emperorís character even more.


In western fiction the narrator often provides range-hardened wisdom during the course of the narrative that leaves you feeling as if you've saddled up a horse and are paired up an agreeable partner that has much to teach you.


Some writing intentionally portrays the narrator as distant and rather formal in their story telling. In this case the writer does not wish to have the narrator play a significant role in the storyline and only wishes them to fill in the blanks with no commentary or personality showing through.


Determining the voice of your narrator can be an important element in the development of your story. Choosing the 'voice' of your narrator may be best achieved early in the story-writing process to avoid needless rewriting.





Who Is Speaking? Choosing A Narrator's Voice

When an author decides to write fiction one the primary methods of storytelling is through a first person perspective. For many writers this is the most comfortable manner of storytelling.


In a first person narrative the reader is allowed to relate to the story one dimensionally. The story is presented to the reader from the viewpoint of a character in the story. The narrator might be the main character attempting to relate their own story. The story might also be told from the perspective of a bystander who may not be overtly involved in the storyline.


In the movie, ìCharlie and the Chocolate Factory, the story is narrated by a deeper male voice. It is only at the end that we discover the story was related by one of Willie Wonkaís Oompa Loompas. This is an example of first person storytelling.


This type of story telling is well used in cinema. Many early filmmakers used first person narrative to present their stories. The reason this type of format was used is primarily due to early filmmaking technology that required some help in the transition between scenes. Narration provided that transition. Film noir and other detective dramas relied heavily on first personal narratives to further their storylines.


Todayís authors are more adept at relating a story from other perspectives such as second or third person which will be dealt with in other articles.


A first person narrative allows you to understand the specific character of the narrator. You are likely to find yourself identifying with the storyteller in a variety of ways. You will either love or despise their mannerisms, but it is their character that provides the strongest connection to the storytelling process.



This type of story telling is well used in cinema. Many early filmmakers used first person narrative to present their stories. The reason this type of format was used is primarily due to early filmmaking technology that required some help in the transition between scenes. Narration provided that transition. Film noir and other detective dramas relied heavily on first personal narratives to further their storylines.


Todayís authors are more adept at relating a story from other perspectives such as second or third person which will be dealt with in other articles.


A first person narrative allows you to understand the specific character of the narrator. You are likely to find yourself identifying with the storyteller in a variety of ways. You will either love or despise their mannerisms, but it is their character that provides the strongest connection to the storytelling process.